Monthly Health Focus

  • October 2014: Breast Cancer: What You Should Know

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Normal cells in the breast divide and grow in an orderly way, but they can change into cells that grow and divide abnormally to form a mass of cells called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Malignant tumors, called breast cancer, are made up of tumor cells that can invade nearby tissues and spread to distant parts of the body.
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  • September 2014: Your Kidneys and How They Work

    The kidneys filter waste and fluid out of the bloodstream. Every day when we eat and drink, we ingest extra water, salt, potassium, calcium, and other minerals and electrolytes into the body. The body needs to keep these fluids and electrolytes in a very fine balance in order for our organs and cells to function properly.
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  • August 2014: About Sciatica

    Technically, the term sciatica refers to pain, discomfort or tingling down the back of the leg due to a problem with the sciatic nerve, a large nerve that runs from your lower back down the back of your leg.
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  • July 2014: Is Your Skin Telling You Something?

    We love the sunny days of spring and summer in Chicago—riding our bikes along the lake, going to street festivals and attending baseball games. But we need to be smart when we’re outside; time in the sun is a double-edged sword. While we require vitamin D from the sun to help our bodies regulate calcium and phosphate, we also run the risk of skin cancer.
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  • June 2014: Keep Your Brain Healthy As You Age

    No two people age the same. Normal aging is associated with physical and mental changes and some degree of decline in abilities such as hearing, visual acuity, motor speed, sleep and certain cognitive function. The cognitive abilities most often affected in normal aging include decreases in sustained attention, a slower rate of learning new information, less cognitive flexibility and decreased ability to recall detailed information.
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  • May 2014: Treating Heel Pain with Extra-corporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT)

    Plantar fasciitis occurs when the band of tissue that supports the arch of the foot becomes painful and inflamed. Extra-corporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment for plantar fasciitis. ESWT uses sound waves to increase blood flow to an area and stimulate a healing response.
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  • April 2014: Microsurgical Treatment of Lymphedema

    Lymphedema is a chronic, debilitating condition resulting in the painful swelling of one arm or leg; sometimes both, affecting up to 250 million people worldwide. Most cases of lymphedema are caused by the removal of major lymph nodes located in the arm pits, a common procedure performed as part of certain cancer treatments.
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  • March 2014: Colon Cancer FAQ

    By age 50 everyone should have a colonoscopy. You should begin screening earlier if you have a personal or family history of colorectal cancer. A colonoscopy examines the entire length of the lower bowel, and provides the opportunity to remove and biopsy polyps.
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  • February 2014: How is Whiplash Treated?

    People experiencing neck pain that does not radiate below the shoulder typically have limited treatment options, especially after an accident. The onset of sudden pain due to an accident is called whiplash. Physicians diagnose patients experiencing this type of pain with cervical facet syndrome, a condition that often occurs after whiplash.
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  • January 2014: Understanding and Managing Diabetes

    Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death, the leading cause of kidney failure, and the leading cause of blindness among adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes affects greater than eight percent of the U.S. population.
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  • December 2013: How to Keep Your Santa-ty During the Holiday Season

    No doubt the celebrations of the holidays bring moments of love, joy, and happiness—at least that is how it should be or how we want to believe it is. Christmas specials and Hallmark cards set up expectations that most "real" families cannot possibly meet. And that in turn may cause holiday stress.
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  • November 2013: Don't Let the Flu Get You This Winter

    The cold weather is here, and with it comes runny noses and lasting coughs. The Centers for Disease Control estimates that up to 20 percent of U.S. residents could get the seasonal flu this year.
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  • October 2013: Breast Reconstruction Q & A

    During a lumpectomy, a portion of the breast is removed that contains the cancerous cells. Radiation therapy is needed after a lumpectomy to fully treat the cancer. During a mastectomy, all of the breast tissue is removed often including the nipple. The breast skin is usually left behind which aids in breast reconstruction. Radiation therapy is often not needed following mastectomy.
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  • September 2013: The Signs of Prostate Problems

    Despite awareness campaigns in recent years, many men don’t know the common symptoms indicating prostate problems and the dangers that can occur if left untreated. It’s important to have the prostate checked at routine medical exams starting at age 40.
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  • August 2013: Rethink Your Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

    Many studies have linked sugar-sweetened beverages to increased obesity rates which can contribute to diabetes, heart disease, bone and joint problems, asthma and even cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 46 percent of added sugars in the American diet come from soda, energy drinks, sports drinks and fruit drinks. The majority these drinks are made up of added sugars.
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  • July 2013: Is Your Skin Telling You Something?

    We love the sunny days of spring and summer in Chicago—riding our bikes along the lake, going to street festivals and attending baseball games. But we need to be smart when we’re outside; time in the sun is a double-edged sword. While we require vitamin D from the sun to help our bodies regulate calcium and phosphate, we also run the risk of skin cancer.
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  • June 2013: Understanding Sepsis

    Sepsis can be defined as a toxic response to infection, and is sometimes called blood poisoning. Sepsis is the body’s response to infection or injury and often times can be deadly. We are exposed to bacteria every moment in time. When our immune system become diminished, we may be infected with an organism, and develop a number of different infections.
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  • May 2013: About Sciatica

    Technically, the term sciatica refers to pain, discomfort or tingling down the back of the leg due to a problem with the sciatic nerve, a large nerve that runs from your lower back down the back of your leg. More informally, the term has been used to refer to any symptoms radiating down the back of the leg whether associated with the sciatic nerve or not.
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  • April 2013: Beyond CPAP: New Non-invasive and Minimally-invasive Techniques to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    As many as 50 million Americans suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), obstruction of the upper airways during sleep. This condition can be brought on by many different causes and has numerous dangerous side effects. Besides snoring and daytime sleepiness, OSA can also increase the risk for heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. And OSA can worsen the effects of existing conditions, such as diabetes.
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  • March 2013: Facts About Kidney Stones

    A kidney stone is a hard mass developed from crystals that separate from the urine within the urinary tract. If the crystals remain tiny enough, they will travel through the urinary tract and pass out of the body in the urine without being noticed. The most common symptoms associated with kidney stones are sudden pain or blood in the urine.
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  • February 2013: Are You Heart Healthy?

    With a little effort, anyone can improve the health of their heart and live a longer and more active life. Most people know that weight is often associated with overall health, but many people don’t realize how important maintaining a normal weight really is to achieving and holding on to good health.
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  • January 2013: New Therapy for Knee Pain

    Arthritis affects 21 million Americans. According to the American College of Rheumatology, almost 70 percent of those aged 70+ have the disease, typically showing up in the weight-bearing knee joints.
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  • December 2012: Treatment Options for Osteoporosis

    According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, osteoporosis affects 44 million Americans. Osteoporosis is a disease where bones become weak and brittle. This disease occurs when the body experiences excessive bone loss or makes too little bone, or both. In this second article of a two-part series, Dr. Azad discusses treatment options and steps for prevention. The first article published in November 2012, presented facts, symptoms, risk factors and diagnosis of osteoporosis.
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  • November 2012: Facts about Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is a disease where bones become weak and brittle. This disease occurs when the body experiences excessive bone loss or makes too little bone, or both. In this first article of a two-part series, I discuss facts, symptoms, risk factors and diagnosis of osteoporosis. The second article, to be published in December, 2012, will present treatment options and steps for prevention.
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  • October 2012: Breast Cancer Basics

    Breast cancer is a type of cancer where cells in the breast divide and grow abnormally. It is second only to lung cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. Tumors in the breast tend to grow slowly. By the time a lump is large enough to feel, it may have been growing for as long as 10 years. Some tumors can be aggressive, however, and grow more rapidly.
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  • September 2012: Understanding Prostate Cancer Screening and the PSA “Controversy”

    Each year, over 30,000 men will die from prostate cancer in the United States. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. It is estimated that one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, with African-American men facing a one in three chance of being diagnosed.
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  • August 2012: Is Heel Pain Keeping You Out of Your Shoes?

    Many of us at one time or another has experienced plantar fasciitis, a common foot problem that causes pain in the heel. The plantar fascia is a ligament-like band of tissue which spans from the heel to the ball of the foot. This “band” pulls on the heel bone, raising the arch of the foot as it pushes off the ground. But if the foot moves incorrectly, the plantar fascia may become strained.
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  • July 2012: Understanding Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in adults older than 50 years in developed countries, and a major cause of visual loss worldwide. The retina is the nerve layer lining the wall of our eye, and is responsible for sight. ARMD affects the macula, the portion of the retina responsible for center vision.
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  • June 2012: Rethink Your Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

    It is undeniable that there has been increased concern over excessive sugar consumption as highlighted in the press lately. To address this growing concern, Vanguard Weiss Memorial Hospital has changed the beverage lineup in the cafeteria and vending machines. The media spotlight and changes at the hospital are driven by studies that have linked sugar-sweetened beverages to increased obesity rates which can contribute to diabetes, heart disease, bone and joint problems, asthma and even cancer.
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  • May 2012: Painful Bladder Syndrome

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are an infrequent occurrence during a woman’s life. However, if UTIs occur more than three times a year, or if symptoms persist after the infection has been treated, this could be a sign of a painful bladder.
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  • April 2012: Prevention of Running Injuries

    As sure as the longer days and warmer temperatures are harbingers of springtime in Chicago, so is the sight of runners coming out of winter hibernation. Unfortunately, after a few months of diminished winter activity, springtime enthusiasm can often lead to injuries. Whether you’re a seasoned marathoner or a beginning runner, adding on the miles too quickly can lead to injury.
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  • March 2012: Uncovering the Causes behind Protein in the Urine

    Protein loss in the urine is called proteinuria. Whenever there is protein in the urine that means that there is a problem with the filter in the kidney. Your doctor may order some initial tests to see if the condition is temporary and benign or if it requires a referral to a nephrologist (kidney specialist).
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  • February 2012: The New Face of Heart Disease

    Over the years, the face of heart attacks—medically known as myocardial infarctions—has become the middle-aged male, overweight, stressed out and generally unhealthy. His symptoms include severe pain in the chest and tingling in the arms. But heart attack symptoms and their victims are far more varied than that.
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  • January 2012: Fix My Droopy Eyelids!

    While there are many things that can be bothersome about the eyes, the most common complaint is droopy upper eyelids. This condition can cause a heavy feeling to the eyes, and can make them feel tired.
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  • December 2011: Be Healthy this Coming Year: Prevention is the Best Medicine

    Start the new year off right by exercising, eating a healthy diet and taking care of your feet. By following these three easy steps, you increase your ability to fight many diseases including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, hardening of the arteries, heart disease, arthritis and many more.
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  • November 2011: Identifying, Understanding and Managing Diabetes

    As we welcome the entrance of the winter, we also celebrate warm, plentiful meals with loved ones. November is National Diabetes Month and I would like to take this opportunity to discuss this very serious health concern. 25 million people in the United States have diabetes and approximately 79 million people have pre-diabetes.
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  • October 2011: State of the Art Breast Reconstruction with Free Tissue Transfer

    It is estimated that over 12 percent of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. In 2007, this translated into more than 1.3 million new diagnoses of invasive breast cancer worldwide, with close to 200,000 cases occurring in the United States alone. Surgical therapy (mastectomy) remains an integral part of the treatment for breast cancer. With an understanding of the psychological benefits of breast reconstruction, the plastic surgeon has assumed an integral role in the multidisciplinary treatment of women with breast cancer.
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  • September 2011: Can a 15 Minute Outpatient Procedure Cure Your Urinary Incontinence?

    Thirty million women in the United States suffer from urinary incontinence, the involuntary loss of bladder control causing leakage of urine. Several medical conditions can increase a woman’s risk of developing incontinence, such as multiple pregnancies, hysterectomy, obesity and age. Another common cause of incontinence is the "overactive bladder.”
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  • August 2011: Abnormal Menstrual Bleeding

    When a woman has a period more frequently than once a month or her periods become heavier than normal, these symptoms can become quite distressing. She may be concerned she has a serious disorder, but more often than not, a simple problem exists along with a simple cure.
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  • July 2011: Stress Fractures in the Foot

    The foot is comprised of 26 bones with a complex arrangement of ligaments and tendons. Stress fractures may occur when forces within the foot overpower the strength of the bone. The most common area for foot stress fractures is in the long bones known as the metatarsals. There are five metatarsals that vary in length.
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  • June 2011: Training Tips for the “Weekend Warrior”

    Now that the weather is warmer, more and more people participate in various outdoor activities. However, after a long period of inactivity during the cold Chicago winter and early spring, it can be hard to transition to being active outside, which means there’s a good chance we will become weekend warriors.
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  • May 2011: Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    As a woman ages, particularly if she has delivered several babies, her pelvic organs can start to sag or even come through the opening of the vagina. While this can be an uncomfortable malady, a specialist in urogynecology can suggest options to treat this condition, called pelvic organ prolapse.
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  • April 2011: Spring Rain and Joint Pain—Does Weather Affect the Bones?

    Since the time of Hippocrates, physicians have recorded their patients’ abilities to correlate joint pain with changes in the weather, particularly the onset of rain or inclement weather. Even today, many patients present anecdotal evidence of this perplexing experience.
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  • March 2011: How Sleep Disorders Affect Your Health

    With one-third of our life spent in sleep, healthy sleep is an important part of our overall health. A number of disorders occur during sleep, which may seriously impact a person’s health as well as how he or she feels overall. Sleep medicine is a medical specialty that deals with disorders of sleep and a sleep specialist is a medical professional with special training and certification to treat such disorders.
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  • February 2011: Recognizing and Preventing Heart Attacks

    Heart attacks occur most often as a result of a condition called Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). With CAD plaque, a fatty material, builds up over many years on the inside walls of the coronary arteries. Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture, causing a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot is large enough, it can mostly or completely block the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the part of the heart muscle fed by the artery.
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  • January 2011: Taking the Mystery out of Autoimmune Diseases

    Our body’s immune system has the ability to distinguish self from non-self. Usually, the immune system cells (called lymphocytes) are tolerant to self, meaning they fight body invaders such as viruses, bacteria and parasites but recognize other cells of the organism as belonging to “self” and do not react to them. Autoimmunity results when there is a breakdown of the mechanism that regulates immune tolerance.
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  • December 2010: Holiday Shoes and Foot Neuromas

    With the holidays rapidly approaching, we all want to look our best. While dress shoes may go nicely with your outfit, they may not fit your feet properly and may cause discomfort. A very common ailment from wearing ill-fitting shoes is a neuroma.
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  • November 2010: Cartilage Injuries of the Knee—Meniscus Injuries

    The menisci are two crescent-shaped cartilage structures that help to protect the knee, lubricate the knee joint and absorb stresses throughout the knee. Meniscus cartilage serves as a type of padding between the bones that make up the knee joint. This is referred to as the common condition “torn cartilage in the knee.”
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  • October 2010: Breast Cancer Basics

    Breast cancer is a type of cancer where cells in the breast divide and grow abnormally. It is second only to lung cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. Tumors in the breast tend to grow slowly. By the time a lump is large enough to feel, it may have been growing for as long as 10 years. Some tumors can be aggressive, however, and grow more rapidly.
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  • September 2010: Articular Cartilage Injuries of the Knee

    When articular cartilage is healthy and intact, it allows for normal, pain-free motion of the knee. However, an injury to the cartilage can be painful and can lead to progressive limitation in function. Fortunately, there are many treatment options for these injuries.
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  • August 2010: Detecting and Treating Glaucoma

    Glaucoma is a serious, potentially disabling disorder of the optic nerve related to elevated intraocular pressure. It generally affects both eyes, although at the time of diagnosis, one eye may be more advanced than the other. It can effect all ages, races and ethnic groups, but one commonality is that most glaucoma sufferers are over age 40.
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  • July 2010: Healthy Summer Feet

    As warmer weather arrives, more of us start to wear sandals, flip flops and all types of “not so good for our feet” shoes. When we are not careful with our selection of shoes, foot problems can arise. Following are some common problems and simple solutions.
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  • June 2010: Cervical Cancer and HPV

    Cervical cancer is a cancer that starts in the cervix, the lower part of the uterus. It may present with vaginal bleeding but symptoms are often absent until the cancer is in its advanced stages. In 2009, there were estimated to be 11,000 new cases of invasive cervical cancer in the United States, and this year 4,000 cervical cancer-related deaths are expected.
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  • May 2010: Diagnosing and Treating Scoliosis

    Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine. Instead of a straight vertical line from the neck to the buttocks, the spine has a C- or S-shape. Scoliosis can affect both children and adults and can develop at any time—from infant through the senior years. Many people do not realize that scoliosis can develop at any time in your life.
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  • April 2010: The Facts About Cataract

    We are born with a crystalline lens in the eye that helps the eye focus light onto the back of the eye. A cataract is the clouding of the natural lens in the eye. When the natural lens is clouded, this can lead to decreased vision.
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  • March 2010: Sublingual (Under the Tongue) Immunotherapy

    Many people suffer with allergies because of the inconvenience of going to a physician’s office or a fear of needles. For these people there is another option. Instead of regular allergy shots and needles, this self-administered alternative comes in the form of droplets, which are put under the tongue three times daily.
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  • February 2010: The Impact of Heart Failure on the Individual and Health Care

    Heart failure is the number one hospital medical diagnosis today and the number one reason for hospital readmissions. According to the American Heart Association, an estimated 5.7 million Americans are living with heart failure, and 670,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.
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  • January 2010: Carpal Tunnel and Cubital Tunnel Syndromes

    The two most common causes of nerve compression in the upper extremity are carpal tunnel syndrome that affects the wrist and cubital tunnel syndrome that affects the elbow. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid permanent nerve damage and/or weakness.
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  • December 2009: New Ideas about Chronic Pain and its Treatment

    Pain is a large and growing problem in the United States. More than one-third of Americans suffer from some form of chronic pain, and more than 50 million are partially or completely disabled due to chronic pain. As the population ages, this number is expected to get even higher.
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  • November 2009: An Update on Hip and Knee Replacement

    Hip and knee replacements have truly revolutionized the treatment of arthritis and are one of the greatest innovations in all of medicine in terms of quality of life and pain relief. With improved technology and updated surgical techniques, the durability of these implants has vastly improved.
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  • October 2009: Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, with one in eight developing the disease in their lifetime. Primarily because of better screening, the mortality rate of breast cancer has declined by 20 percent over the last 10 years.
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  • September 2009: Alzheimer’s Disease

    Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people and it usually occurs in people older than 60. AD is slightly more common in females.
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  • August 2009: Steps to Healthy Summer Feet

    Feet aren’t supposed to hurt. If they do, finding out why and curing it right away can make this season even more enjoyable.
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  • July 2009: The Impact of Robotic Surgery on Healthcare

    Today the use of new robotic surgical systems and advanced surgical instruments is growing rapidly among many health care specialties. At many institutions, including Weiss, robotic surgery is routinely employed and all the operative room personnel are very familiar with the system.
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  • June 2009: Prostate Cancer Screening – 2009 Best Practice Guidelines

    While the AUA guidelines call for screenings to begin at a younger age, they express an individualized assessment and approach for proceeding with prostate biopsies.
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  • May 2009: Cold Hands, Warm Heart: Understanding Cold Hand Diseases

    As our unseasonably long winter finally comes to an end, the time for having cold hands is over. However, if your hands stay cold when others around you are warm, you may have a medical condition that can be treated by the hand specialists at Weiss Memorial Hospital.
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  • April 2009: Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Summary

    Macular degeneration is characterized by a loss of function in the portion of the eye responsible for central vision. Because central vision makes possible the detailed sight required for activities such as reading, driving and recognizing faces, macular degeneration may significantly diminish the ability to function.
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  • March 2009: Current Concepts in Treating Heel Pain

    The most common cause for heel pain is plantar fasciitis, a condition known for causing pain in the heel, especially with first steps. Generally this pain subsides after several minutes to a half hour or so.
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  • February 2009: Managing Heart Disease

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States and most other developed nations despite significant advances in prevention, detection and treatment.
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  • January 2009: Management of the Stiff Shoulder

    In 1934, orthopedic surgeon and medical reformer Ernest Codman, M.D., coined the term “frozen shoulder” to describe shoulder stiffness and pain, saying it was “difficult to define, difficult to treat and difficult to explain from the point of view of pathology.”
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  • December 2008: Diagnosing and Caring for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most disabling types of arthritis. Significant improvements in treatment during the past decade have dramatically improved the prognoses of newly diagnosed patients.
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  • November 2008: Identifying and Managing Diabetes Mellitus

    Diabetes mellitus is a worldwide health problem. The incidence of diabetes continues to rise in most countries. In 2007, approximately 7.8 percent of Americans were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus.
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  • October 2008: Breast Cancer Facts

    Among women, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths, behind lung cancer.
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  • September 2008: Screenings and Revolutionary Surgical Tools Keep Men a Step Ahead of Prostate Cancer

    The statistics on prostate cancer are sobering—more than one in six men will be diagnosed with the disease. But prostate cancer usually grows slowly, so unlike other, more deadly cancers, only 4 percent of men die from it.
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  • August 2008: Treating and Managing Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    “Why won’t this sore heal?” If you or someone you know has asked this question, then you may understand the frustration of living with a cut or sore that only gets bigger no matter what treatments are tried.
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  • July 2008: Recognizing Hypertension

    Hypertension is a medical term meaning high blood pressure. Hypertension is a very common condition in adults that gets more common with age.
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  • June 2008: Determining the Root of Your Headache

    We have all, at some time in our lives, been affected by a headache. Headache and backache are two of the most common reasons for seeking medical attention.
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  • May 2008: Breast Cancer Facts

    Among women, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths, behind lung cancer.
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  • April 2008: Managing Arthritis

    Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Additionally, rheumatoid arthritis affects 2.1 million Americans, 21 million Americans live with osteoarthritis, and more than 300,000 children have some form of juvenile arthritis.
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  • March 2008: Women: Listen To Your Heart

    What is the biggest threat to your health? It is not breast cancer. According to the American Heart Association, each year heart disease kills more women than all types of cancer combined.
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  • February 2008: Women: Listen To Your Heart

    What is the biggest threat to your health? It is not breast cancer. According to the American Heart Association, each year heart disease kills more women than all types of cancer combined.
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  • January 2008: Healthy Holiday Eating Hints

    December has arrived and the holiday season is in full swing! Shopping, wrapping, baking, shipping, and parties fill our already busy lives with many more activities, and, at times, stress. Controlling our weight and blood sugar levels during this time of the year can be especially daunting.
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  • December 2007: Healthy Holiday Eating Hints

    December has arrived and the holiday season is in full swing! Shopping, wrapping, baking, shipping, and parties fill our already busy lives with many more activities, and, at times, stress. Controlling our weight and blood sugar levels during this time of the year can be especially daunting.
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  • November 2007: Recognize Diabetes and Take Control for Better Health

    The Wound Healing Center at Weiss specializes in the treatment of chronic wounds and offers hospital-based outpatient wound care and hyperbaric oxygen therapy as well as disease management and diabetes care.
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  • October 2007: Take Action Against Stroke: Closer to 55, Stroke Risk Doubles

    The Vascular Center at Weiss is offering low-cost three-point vascular screenings for those persons at risk for a stroke, aneurysm or peripheral vascular disease.
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  • September 2007: Take Action Against Stroke: Closer to 55, Stroke Risk Doubles

    The Vascular Center at Weiss is offering low-cost three-point vascular screenings for those persons at risk for a stroke, aneurysm or peripheral vascular disease.
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  • August 2007: Get Fit This Summer Through Smart Exercise Habits and Healthier Eating

    Summertime is upon us and it’s a great time to get healthier. The days are warm and long and open to so many exciting activities to keep you trim or on your way to shedding those extra pounds stored up over the winter.
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  • July 2007: Get Fit This Summer Through Smart Exercise Habits and Healthier Eating

    Summertime is upon us and it’s a great time to get healthier. The days are warm and long and open to so many exciting activities to keep you trim or on your way to shedding those extra pounds stored up over the winter.
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  • June 2007: Take Action Against Stroke: As Baby Boomers Move Closer to 55, Stroke Risk Doubles

    The Vascular Center at Weiss is offering low-cost three-point vascular screenings for those persons at risk for a stroke, aneurysm or peripheral vascular disease.
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  • May 2007: May is Better Speech and Hearing Month

    The National Institute of Health reports that 15 percent of 55-64 year olds, 30 percent of 65-74 year olds and 40 percent of those 75+ have a hearing loss that affects communication.
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  • April 2007: Expert Tips for Safe Exercise

    As a physician with the U.S. Figure Skating Team and personal orthopedic surgeon for Olympic silver-medalist Sasha Cohen, Craig Westin, M.D., knows a thing or two about tuning up your body for springtime sports. We asked Dr. Westin about how he preps Cohen for competition
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  • March 2007: March is Colon Awareness Month

    Right now, at this moment, you have the opportunity to take a simple step that could save your life. How? By having a screening colonoscopy.
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  • February 2007: Cardiac Rehabilitation: The Key to Building and Maintaining Heart Health

    According to the American Heart Association, coronary heart disease is the number one killer in the United States today. Chances are you or someone you know has experienced heart disease first hand through a heart attack.
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  • January 2007: Combating Morbid Obesity

    If you are severely overweight you are not alone. Obesity in the United States has become an epidemic; over 60 million Americans have a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30, the point which divides ‘overweight’ from ‘obese.’
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  • December 2006: Winter, the Holidays and Your Mood: Finding Balance

    As we head into the holiday season, many of us become overwhelmed with a wide variety of expectations. We struggle to meet all of the demands of work, family, holiday shopping, parties and other obligations.
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  • November 2006: Unsuspecting Millions at Risk For Diabetes

    This November, as the nation observes American Diabetes Month, attention will focus upon the 18 million Americans coping with the disease. Yet more than twice that number, 41 million adults, have pre-diabetes symptoms and may not even be aware they are at risk.
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  • October 2006: The Fight Against Breast Cancer

    Every woman is at risk for developing breast cancer. As a woman, it is very important to become educated about this disease and what preventive measures you can start taking today.
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  • September 2006: Identifying and Treating Pain Caused by Fibromyalgia

    Fibromyalgia is a condition that causes people to experience increased pain throughout their bodies, typically accompanied by severe fatigue and sleep disruption.
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  • August 2006: Diabetics Know Little About Preventable Measures to Reduce Amputation

    According to the American Diabetes Association, up to one in four people with diabetes who get a foot ulcer will eventually require a lower limb amputation. After an initial amputation, the chance of another amputation within three to five years can reach 50 percent.
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  • July 2006: PMS and Menopause Relief Tailored To Your Body

    Hormonal changes are a part of aging for every woman. But your experience with these shifts—whether they come during your monthly period or with the onset of menopause—is different from that of your co-workers, neighbors and even your close relatives.
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  • June 2006: Running Into Trouble

    Now that the warmer weather is here, runners are increasingly seen on the lakefront and city streets. Soon Chicago Marathon training programs will be in full swing.
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  • May 2006: Demystifying Anti-Aging Medicine

    You have years to go before you need to start worrying about weight gain, arthritis, and dementia — right? Not according to the principles of anti-aging medicine, a proactive approach to health care that focuses on preventing age-related disease by addressing your lifestyle today.
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  • April 2006: Expert Tips for Safe Exercise

    As a physician with the U.S. Figure Skating Team and personal orthopedic surgeon for Olympic silver-medalist Sasha Cohen, Craig Westin, M.D., knows a thing or two about tuning up your body for springtime sports. We asked Dr. Westin about how he preps Cohen for competition.
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  • March 2006: Combating Morbid Obesity

    If you are severely overweight you are not alone. Obesity in the United States has become an epidemic; over 60 million Americans have a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30, the point which divides ‘overweight’ from ‘obese.’
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  • February 2006: Women and Heart Disease

    Heart disease is the number one cause of death in American women. Despite the fact that it is estimated that almost one in three women will eventually die of heart disease or stroke, a 2003 American Heart Association poll showed that only 13 percent of American women considered heart disease their greatest health risk.
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  • January 2006: Five Warnings Signs of A Stroke

    A stroke can happen in an instant—and you may not even know what it is. According to the American Stroke Association, there are five warning signs that can help you identify the onset of a stroke:
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  • December 2005: Women and Heart Disease

    Heart disease is the number one cause of death in American women. Despite the fact that it is estimated that almost one in three women will eventually die of heart disease or stroke, a 2003 American Heart Association poll showed that only 13 percent of American women considered heart disease their greatest health risk.
    Read More
  • November 2005: Early Detection of Diabetes is Key to Preventing Serious Health Complications

    You may be surprised to hear that people may be diabetic and not even know it! Many times, people will have diabetes for 10 years or more before they start to notice symptoms.
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  • October 2005: The Fight Against Breast Cancer

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. As a physician of Women’s Health Specialists at Weiss, Dr. Hollingsworth is dedicated to fully educating women about health needs, and strives to be your partner in health.
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